We would like to take a moment to note that this post is for information purposes only. It does not claim to provide medical advice or to be able to treat any medical condition. It makes no claims in respect to weight loss, either in terms of the amount or rate at which weight loss could be achieved. If you have any concerns regarding your health please contact your medical practitioner before making changes.
Pu Erh tea is named after the town Pu’er in the Yunnan province in China. And guess what – this tea is also obtained from Camellia sinensis. This is a specially fermented tea and is also known as black tea. Scientists have found that Pu Erh tea has lipid-lowering properties, and it helps reduce weight in patients with metabolic syndrome (28), (29).
This fermented Chinese tea might do to your fat cells what the New England Patriots allegedly do to their footballs—deflate them! To discover the brew’s fat-crusading powers, Chinese researchers fed groups of rats varying diets over a two-month period. Those who had a high-fat diet while also receiving pu-erh tea extract had lower levels of fat in their blood and lower levels of belly fat than those who did not. While the effects aren’t proven in humans, this tea has true fat-blasting potential. Sip a cup in the morning, and get even skinnier with the 8 ways to lose weight before noon.
After dinner, wash all the dishes, wipe down the counters, turn out the light, and, if necessary, tape closed the cabinets and refrigerator. Late-evening eating significantly increases the overall number of calories you eat, a University of Texas study found. Learning how to stop late-night snacking can save 300 or more calories a day, or 31 pounds a year.

Chia seeds are chock-full of fiber, and can therefore be a great appetite suppressant, Bauer says. “Sprinkle chia seeds on oatmeal or yogurt, or toss them into smoothies and pancake batter,” she suggests. “They’ll swell in your stomach—up to nine times their size!—to keep you feeling full for hours.” Healthful chia seeds are largely soluble fiber, which has been associated with reduced intake and appetite, Dr. Axe adds. Other smart sources of soluble fiber include legumes, oats, asparagus, and flaxseed. “Remember to increase your fiber intake slowly and pair it with increased water intake as well to prevent unpleasant digestive symptoms like gas and constipation,” he says. Learn about these other 30 tiny diet changes that can help you lose weight.
Nonherbal teas are also generally effective for weight loss because they too are very low-calorie beverages. Green tea, for example, helps suppress your appetite and enhances metabolism, according to the 2010 study in the “Journal of Nurse Practitioners." Many nonherbal teas also contain caffeine, while most herbal teas do not. While caffeine can boost your energy level and help you burn extra calories throughout the day, which is beneficial for weight loss, it’s not the best choice at night because it can cause difficulty sleeping.
A Physicians Committee study tested a plant-based diet in a group of 64 women. At the start of the study, all of the women were moderately or severely overweight. Participants followed two simple rules: They set aside all animal products and kept oils to a minimum. They lost about a pound per week, without calorie counting or exercise. After two years, they maintained the weight loss.
Popular weight loss pills — like guarana, garcinia cambogia or ephedrine — are often used to suppress one’s appetite and help with weight loss. But it’s fairly common to experience some side effects when taking these products, including jitteriness, anxiety, trouble sleeping, indigestion, diarrhea, rapid heartbeat or headaches, which is why natural appetite suppressants are always better options.
Mansour, M. S., Ni, Y.-M., Roberts, A. L., Kelleman, M., RoyChoudhury, A., & St-Onge, M.-P. (2013, October 1). Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism, 61(10), 1347–1352. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408800/
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