Many who switch to a vegan diet for weight-loss reasons often find themselves filling the meatless void with an array of plant-based processed food. Luckily, a veg diet is so much more than packaged food that just happens to be animal-free, especially for those looking to lose weight. By following these six tips, you’ll fit into your favorite pair of jeans in no time, all while doing good for animals and the environment.
When eating, it takes 20 minutes for your body to register fullness. And according to a University of Rhode Island study, you can save 70 calories by eating slowly over about half an hour versus eating in under 10 minutes. If you ate slower at every meal, that would translate into losing about two pounds a month. An easy way to slow down your eating is to put your fork down between bites—or consider using chopsticks.
This is the best easy diet for people who can make a financial commitment to a diet program (depending on the amount of weight you have to lose, your total cost can run in the thousands) and people who don't like to or don't have time to prepare three meals each day. Keep in mind, however, that plans like Jenny Craig and Weight Watchers do encourage dieters to learn to cook for improved weight loss and weight maintenance.
Ashwagandha tea gives you a better outlook on life and reduces stress hormones that can wreak havoc on your waistline. A study published in the Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine found that “Ashwagandha root extract safely and effectively improves an individual’s resistance towards stress and thereby improves self-assessed quality of life.” When it comes to weight loss, stress is not your friend. A recent study at Penn State found that people who react badly to stressful situations have increased levels of inflammation in their bodies—and inflammation is directly tied to obesity, as well as diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer. When anxiety rides high, you’re also at the mercy of stress hormones such as cortisol—known as “the belly fat hormone” for its ability to pull lipids from the bloodstream and store them in our fat cells.

A whiff of peppermint may keep hunger at bay. “A study found that when participants smelled peppermint every two hours for five days, they consumed nearly 1,800 fewer total calories that week and rated their hunger level significantly lower than participants not exposed to peppermint,” Bauer says. She suggests lighting a peppermint candle, chewing on peppermint gum, or sipping on peppermint tea to get the appetite-suppressing benefits. Learn about 13 other things experts won’t tell you about weight loss.
Hi Jas! Good to have you with us. Don’t worry – it gets easier! There’s lots to learn, and lots of tricks to help out. In my humble opinion, it’s worth sticking to! I’ve just reset you in our email server – sometimes hotmail moves the emails into the ‘junk’ folder. If you still can’t find it, please search your inbox for ‘your meal plan is here’ and it should pop up!
This fermented Chinese tea can literally shrink the size of your fat cells! To discover the brew’s fat-crusading powers Chinese researchers divided rats into five groups and fed them varying diets over a two month period. In addition to a control group, there was a group given a high-fat diet with no tea supplementation and three additional groups that were fed a high-fat diet with varying doses of pu-erh tea extract. The researchers found that the tea significantly lowered triglyceride concentrations (potentially dangerous fat found in the blood) and belly fat in the high-fat diet groups. Although sipping the tea could have slightly different outcomes in humans, we think these findings are promising enough that it’s still well worth your while to fix yourself a steaming hot cup.
You've been hearing it since you were in grade school, but breaking the fast, the origin of the word breakfast, is a rule to live by. In addition to jump-starting your metabolism, a morning meal has a ripple effect on your intake. Breakfast skippers eat 40 percent more sweets, 55 percent more soda, 45 percent fewer vegetables and 30 percent less fruit than those who eat breakfast. In addition, breakfast skippers are 4.5 times more likely to be overweight.
Thank you so much for that! So great to see not only delicious, but healthier options as well. Already tried stuffed portobellos and they turned out amazing. Also added your baked crumbled tofu to large salads and wow- that was game changer. I am hoping that maybe one day you could make a oil free and weight loss recipes book. Would be such a great addition to your current one!
1. Seek variety in your simple diet by eating a wide array of fruits and vegetables. Our ancient ancestors ate upward of 3,000 calories daily, 70 percent of which came from plants, including fruits, roots, legumes, leaves, sprouts, nuts and seeds. While we eat a few ounces of fresh produce a day, they consumed 3-4 pounds of it. When we do eat a vegetable, it's usually potatoes; many an American has hash browns for breakfast, french fries at lunch, potato chips for a snack and a baked spud with dinner.
Think you know everything about apples and health? Think again. It turns out that eating an apple a day may do more than keep the doctor away; an apple may serve as a natural appetite suppressant. “The combination of pectin, soluble fiber, high water content, and lots of chewing make apples an excellent appetite-taming food,” Bauer says. Plus, these appetite suppressants are portable and portion-controlled, making them an all-around home run, she says.
We use cookies and similar technologies to improve your browsing experience, personalize content and offers, show targeted ads, analyze traffic, and better understand you. We may share your information with third-party partners for marketing purposes. To learn more and make choices about data use, visit our Advertising Policy and Privacy Policy. By clicking “Accept and Continue” below, (1) you consent to these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form, and (2) you consent to allow your data to be transferred, processed, and stored in the United States.
×