They should help keep you from feeling deprived and bingeing on higher-calorie foods. For instance: honey has just 64 fat-releasing calories in one tablespoon. Eggs have just 70 calories in one hard-boiled egg, loaded with fat-releasing protein. Part-skim ricotta cheese has just 39 calories in one ounce, packed with fat-releasing calcium. Dark chocolate has about 168 calories in a one-ounce square, but it’s packed with fat releasers. And a University of Tennessee study found that people who cut 500 calories a day and ate yogurt three times a day for 12 weeks lost more weight and body fat than a group that only cut the calories. The researchers concluded that the calcium in low-fat dairy foods triggers a hormonal response that inhibits the body’s production of fat cells and boosts the breakdown of fat.
"To a lesser degree, black tea has been studied and appears to work more in the intestine by preventing the fat absorption versus green tea. Both teas play a role in microbial gut health leading to an anti-obese environment," explains Valdez. "Overall, whether it be green tea, black tea, white tea, or lemon tea, they all have zero calories and provide hydration, which can be an opportunity to assist with weight loss versus consuming sugary beverages or alcohol. If you want a little antioxidant water, tea is a nice choice. And if you can't tolerate coffee, tea is a perfect substitute." 
Butternut squash and sweet potato are rich in calcium, so no need to worry about ditching dairy products. Broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family and are cancer-fighting superheroes. Green leafy vegetables like kale, collard greens, and spinach will boost your iron levels and if you eat them with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, vitamin C will accelerate your iron absorption.

Ashwagandha tea gives you a better outlook on life and reduces stress hormones that can wreak havoc on your waistline. A study published in the Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine found that “Ashwagandha root extract safely and effectively improves an individual’s resistance towards stress and thereby improves self-assessed quality of life.” When it comes to weight loss, stress is not your friend. A recent study at Penn State found that people who react badly to stressful situations have increased levels of inflammation in their bodies—and inflammation is directly tied to obesity, as well as diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer. When anxiety rides high, you’re also at the mercy of stress hormones such as cortisol—known as “the belly fat hormone” for its ability to pull lipids from the bloodstream and store them in our fat cells.
Studies found that people who keep food diaries wind up eating about 15 percent less food than those who don’t. Watch out for weekends: A University of North Carolina study found people tend to consume an extra 115 calories per weekend day, primarily from alcohol and fat.  Then cut out or down calories from spreads, dressings, sauces, condiments, drinks, and snacks; they could make the difference between weight gain and loss. Here are 50 easy ways to lose weight naturally.

Green tea is kind of trendy these days largely because of the many health benefits that it provides. Among them is green tea’s role as a natural appetite suppressant. “Green tea extract affects two important peptide hormones, norepinephrine and dopamine, which activate the sympathetic nervous system,” Dr. Axe says. “Together, these two hormones are called catecholamines and are well known for their ability to suppress appetite.” In particular, green tea contains a powerful compound called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) that is thought to prevent the breakdown of catecholamines, leading to a reduction in appetite, he explains.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
×