Oolong, a Chinese name for “black dragon,” is a light, floral tea that, like green tea, is also packed with catechins, which help to promote weight loss by boosting your body’s ability to metabolize lipids (fat). A study in the Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine found that participants who regularly sipped oolong tea lost six pounds over the course of the six-week time period. That’s a pound a week! It also has a calming effect. Drink a cup if you’re a nervous flyer, or to calm yourself after a hard day’s work—and if you’re a particularly anxious person, sip these 4 Teas Better Than Therapy!
Here’s the bottom line on using natural appetite suppressants compared to other appetite suppressants: While weight loss pills, teas or other products may possibly give you a lift in energy, dulled appetite or temporarily elevated mood, they’re unlikely to result in any long-term weight loss, especially when you don’t make other healthy lifestyle changes. Focus on eating a well-rounded, nutrient-dense diet, preventing deficiencies in key vitamins or minerals, and staying active. Then you shouldn’t need to turn to weight loss products in the first place.
A 2009 Chinese study examined the ability of oolong tea to increase energy and accelerate weight loss. The study consisted of 102 obese individuals who were examined over a 6-week period. Participants consumed four 8-ounce cups of oolong tea every day during the study. The results showed that 70% of participants lost a minimum of 2 pounds. Almost a quarter of participants lost more than 6 pounds.
Drinking two glasses of water before each meal helps to tame a ferocious appetite, says Bauer.” If water bores you, jazz it up by adding slices of citrus or cucumbers—or a shot of fruit juice,” she suggests. (Here are more flavored water recipes that will make you want to drink up.) Bonus: “If you swap in seltzer water, the bubbles create an even greater sensation of fullness.” Another way to hydrate is to crunch on water-rich veggies—lettuce, cucumbers, radishes, zucchini, and celery. “With more than 95 percent water, these five filler-uppers will keep your appetite in check.” Eat more of these 38 fat-burning foods that help you lose weight.
A gigantic Farmer’s Market-style salad with a variety of fresh seasonal produce and fresh herbs, such as fresh baby arugula and radicchio, and red wine vinegar sassed up with a little horseradish. Enjoy visiting your local Farmer’s Market every week and asking the vendors, “What’s new and tasty this week? What would make great ingredients for my salad?”
Sleep’s a big deal. Losing a mere hour of shut-eye over the course of three days is enough to negatively impact the body’s hunger and appetite-regulating hormone, ghrelin. Quality sleep, on the other hand, fuels the production of fat-burning hormones, making it a top priority if you’re trying to drop a few pounds. Valerian is an herb that’s long been valued as a mild sedative, and now research is showing what tea enthusiasts have known for centuries. In a study of women, researchers gave half the test subjects a valerian extract, and half a placebo. Thirty percent of those who received valerian reported an improvement in the quality of their sleep, versus just 4 percent of the control group.
I've had plenty of clients who believed it was okay to eat unlimited amounts of plant-based treats (think coconut milk ice cream and sweet potato chips). Plant-based frozen foods, desserts, and snacks can not only be high in calories, but they're often made with refined flour and added sugar, and stripped of nutrients and fiber. While they're fine as occasional treats, when consumed daily, they can pack on pounds. One study found that processed foods may decrease post-meal calorie burning by nearly 50% compared to whole foods. Trade processed plant foods for fresh snacks. Reach for in-season fruit and dark chocolate to satisfy a sweet craving; and raw veggies with hummus or guacamole for a savory fix.
Yep, there are two meal plans. One 1500 kcal/day (women) and one 1800 kcal/day (men). If you want to calculate your individual calorie intake we recommend modifying the snacks to reach your daily calorie limit. Alternatively you can always vary the calories of a meal by adding or removing certain ingredients (bread, avocado, etc.) to adjust to your individual level.
Green tea is kind of trendy these days largely because of the many health benefits that it provides. Among them is green tea’s role as a natural appetite suppressant. “Green tea extract affects two important peptide hormones, norepinephrine and dopamine, which activate the sympathetic nervous system,” Dr. Axe says. “Together, these two hormones are called catecholamines and are well known for their ability to suppress appetite.” In particular, green tea contains a powerful compound called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) that is thought to prevent the breakdown of catecholamines, leading to a reduction in appetite, he explains.
Pu Erh tea is named after the town Pu’er in the Yunnan province in China. And guess what – this tea is also obtained from Camellia sinensis. This is a specially fermented tea and is also known as black tea. Scientists have found that Pu Erh tea has lipid-lowering properties, and it helps reduce weight in patients with metabolic syndrome (28), (29).

Not only does white tea prevent new fat cells from forming, but it also enhances the body’s ability to break down and utilize existing fat for energy, according to a study published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism. As if that wasn’t enough, “Chemicals in the tea appear to protect your skin from sun-induced stress, which can cause the cells to break down and age prematurely,” says Elma Baron, MD, the study author. To put white tea to use, try rubbing on a lotion containing white tea extract before you apply your sunblock!


Mansour, M. S., Ni, Y.-M., Roberts, A. L., Kelleman, M., RoyChoudhury, A., & St-Onge, M.-P. (2013, October 1). Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism, 61(10), 1347–1352. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408800/
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