Centrally acting appetite suppressant drugs used in the treatment of obesity fall into 2 broad pharmacological categories; those which act via brain catecholamine pathways and those which act via serotonin pathways. Of the former group, amphetamine and phenmetrazine are no longer recommended because of their stimulant properties and addictive potential. The remaining drugs in this class include amfepramone (diethylpropion), phentermine, mazindol and phenylpropanolamine. All have been shown to reduce appetite and lower food intake, thereby helping obese patients more easily keep to a low-calorie diet and lose weight. They all have some sympathomimetic and stimulant properties. Anorectic drugs which promote serotonin neurotransmission have no such stimulant or sympathomimetic properties. They are fenfluramine, together with its recently introduced dextrorotatory stereoisomer dexfenfluramine, and fluoxetine. They reduce appetite and food intake and are effective in the treatment of obesity. Anorectic drugs should be reserved for those who are clinically at risk from being overweight, and then only as part of a comprehensive weight-reducing programme including regular dietary counselling. Although current licensing regulations only allow their use over a relatively short period (12 to 16 weeks), clinical trials have shown them to be effective over longer periods, particularly in preventing weight regain. Of the compounds currently indicated for use in obesity, dexfenfluramine appears to have the most suitable pharmacological profile, although it should not be given to patients with a history of depression. When used appropriately, appetite suppressants can be of real therapeutic benefit, and pose little risk.
Another weight loss aid that is available in the UK is orlistat, a medication that works by reducing the amount of fat absorbed by your body from the food you eat. It is a prescription only medication and a GP or online doctor need to assess whether it’s suitable for you. Orlistat does not affect your appetite and you need to eat a low fat diet while taking it.

The only diet medication which is currently licensed in the UK as safe and effective is orlistat, which is a lipase inhibitor. This means that it reduces the amount of energy that you take in from the fat contained in foods that you eat, and the undigested fat is passed along with your faeces. It doesn’t suppress the appetite, but instead works by preventing up to a third of the fat that you eat from being absorbed by the body. 
Jonathan Valdez, registered dietitian and owner of Genki Nutrition, agrees. "The catechins in green tea promote fat loss by increasing energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and decreased lipid absorption by the intestine. Valdez believes that even though tea can be used as a fat burner, this shouldn’t promote excess caloric intake. "In the end, over-consumption will trump this process and lead to weight gain. Drinking these teas should be used as more of a complement to weight loss with current habits of decreasing calories and physical activity. Bottom line, tea shouldn’t be relied on as a source of burning calories versus cutting calories and physical activity."
This supplement is a well-rounded appetite suppressant. If not carefully managed, the strain of a new diet can be stressful on your body. This supplement strives to mitigate these possible effects with its ingredients list. The Garcinia Cambogia will stave off your hunger, and the potassium will keep you better hydrated while the calcium will maintain your bone health and strength.
Appetite suppressants are either pills, drinks, supplements or whole foods that help keep you from overeating. Natural appetite suppressants — which have some similarities to commercial weight loss pills but some important differences — may help tackle some of these issues related to obesity or emotional eating in part by balancing levels of “hunger hormones,” such as ghrelin and leptin. Ghrelin and leptin rise and fall throughout the day depending on things like how much you’ve recently eaten, your mood, stress level, sleep, genetics, current weight and level of inflammation. In other words, there’s a lot at play when it comes to suppressing or stimulating your daily appetite.

Hibiscus tea, which is made from the magenta-coloured calyces of the Hibiscus sabdariffa flower, contains high antioxidant properties that may help boost your health in many ways. Several studies have shown that drinking hibiscus tea can help boost weight loss and prevent obesity. This herbal tea may also help lower blood pressure, improve liver health and protect against cancer.
Green tea supplements are one of the most popular additions to weight loss regimens. You can get these same fat burning powers just by drinking a cup of green tea. Green tea catechins reduce belly fat by speeding up metabolic rates. These catechins also boost energy levels so you can attack your workouts harder. Tea catechins also encourage the digestive system to reduce fat storage over time.
Get spicy! According to recent research published in the journal Physiology & Behavior, just half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper can boost metabolism and cause the body to burn an extra 10 calories on its own. Not to mention that for those who don't regularly eat spicy meals, adding cayenne pepper cuts an average of 60 calories from their next meal. Do that at two meals a day for a month and you'll lose 4 pounds without even trying!
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