Most people tend to associate a vegan diet with being lean. And science backs that notion. In a study of 40,000 adults, Oxford University researchers found that meat-eaters had the highest BMIs; vegans had the lowest; and vegetarians and semi-vegetarians landed somewhere in-between. But throughout my years in private practice, I've worked with plenty of clients who did not lose weight after cutting out animal products. And some even gained weight. Here are five common reasons this happens, plus how to avoid them—so you can reap both the health and weight-loss benefits of going vegan.
Black tea is the most popular one, accounting for about 84 percent of all tea consumed. The tea contains polyphenols, which are plant compounds that may be responsible for blocking fat absorption. Studies have also found that drinking a cup of black tea per day improves cardiovascular function. In particular, there are also these awesome rooibos tea benefits.

This red, naturally sweet tea made from the leaves of the Rooibos bush are powerful fat-melters. According to South African researchers, polyphenols and flavonoids found in the plant inhibits adipogenesis—the formation of new fat cells—by as much as 22 percent. The chemicals also aid fat metabolism. Sip this brew to help burn that stubborn bit of chub clinging to your middle, no diet necessary.
There's some scientific evidence that compounds in saffron could have beneficial metabolic effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, and potentially impact weight, says Rekha Kumar, MD, endocrinologist at the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "That doesn’t mean putting [saffron] in a lollipop and telling people to eat it is a healthy approach to weight loss, body image, or nutrition," Dr. Kumar says.
Chamomile tea is obtained from the flowers of M. chamomilla (10). It has anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, sleep-inducing, and anti-anxiety properties (11), (12). Depression, anxiety, inflammation, and sleep deprivation have a direct relation to weight gain. Scientists have found that the presence of phenolic compounds, such as quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, patuletin, and their glucosides, in chamomile tea is responsible for its anti-obesity properties (13). A study also showed that chamomile tea could lower blood sugar levels (14).
By accessing or using this website, you agree to abide by the Terms and Conditions. Please read our Privacy Policy and also Affiliate Disclosure, Comment Policy and Medical Disclaimer. LeanHealthyandWise.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. Pages on this site may include affiliate links to Amazon and it's affiliate sites on which the owner of this website will make a referral commission.

While manufacturers of weight loss pills continue to promote the convenience and rapid results associated with their products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other health authorities warn against their use. Some of the main reasons that appetite-suppressing weight loss pills are considered to be at least somewhat dangerous include medication interactions, tainted or unlisted ingredients, high amounts of caffeine, and fillers or synthetic additives that cause negative reactions, just to name few.

Nonherbal teas are also generally effective for weight loss because they too are very low-calorie beverages. Green tea, for example, helps suppress your appetite and enhances metabolism, according to the 2010 study in the “Journal of Nurse Practitioners." Many nonherbal teas also contain caffeine, while most herbal teas do not. While caffeine can boost your energy level and help you burn extra calories throughout the day, which is beneficial for weight loss, it’s not the best choice at night because it can cause difficulty sleeping.

Although not every study has shown such strong and positive weight loss results associated with green tea extract, it seems safe for most adults to take up to 800–900 milligrams daily, usually spread out over three increments. (4) Although they’re generally rare, when taking green tea extract be on the lookout for reported adverse effects that might include mild headaches, signs of hypertension, constipation or possibly increased symptoms of urinary tract infection.

These recipes look great! I’m excited to try them. Just a comment on the weight loss thing: While it is true that consuming less calories than you burn up should lead to weight loss, eating anything you want to lose weight might not be the healthiest way to go. Many of the diets out there are a recipe for diseases, even though a person might lose weight while doing them. I’m sure you know that but it seemed worth mentioning considering what you wrote. Thanks for your blog and for all the healthy recipes you share.
If you're not a coffee drinker and get sick of water easily, try sipping on a cup of hot green tea. Green tea can help you to stop mindlessly snacking, and nutritionists say that the catechins in green tea help to inhibit the movement of glucose into fat cells, which slows the rise of blood sugar and prevents high insulin and subsequent fat storage. And when your blood sugar is more stable so is your hunger!
×