Legumes are the foundation of any well-rounded vegan meal plan. They deliver enough plant-based protein to keep your metabolism running, your muscles strong and your cravings at bay so you don’t feel the need to grab any processed treats when hunger strikes. Soy products like tofu, tempeh (fermented soy) and soy milk are foods that benefit your weight management efforts the most when consumed in their unprocessed and unsweetened forms.

The foundation of the vegan food pyramid is greens and vegetables followed by fruit and whole grains. This is an updated version of MyPyramid—the food guide that replaced the Food Guide Pyramid in 2005—which emphasized grains, bread, cereal, and pasta as the foundation of a good nutritional regimen. Although the vegan food pyramid serves as a guide, caloric intake and portion control are key factors for any healthy weight-loss program.
In order to help you slim down and optimize your health, vegetarian or vegan meals should contain plenty of vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and healthy plant-based fats like avocado. I’ve met tons of “junk food vegetarians and vegans” who don’t eat the minimum recommended servings of produce and live on highly processed foods like faux pepperoni pizza, veggie hot dogs, vegan cookies, candy, and ice cream. It’s not just about getting the animal-based ingredients out; it’s also about eating whole, nutrient-rich foods.    
Sleep’s a big deal. Losing a mere hour of shut-eye over the course of three days is enough to negatively impact the body’s hunger and appetite-regulating hormone, ghrelin. Quality sleep, on the other hand, fuels the production of fat-burning hormones, making it a top priority if you’re trying to drop a few pounds. Valerian is an herb that’s long been valued as a mild sedative, and now research is showing what tea enthusiasts have known for centuries. In a study of women, researchers gave half the test subjects a valerian extract, and half a placebo. Thirty percent of those who received valerian reported an improvement in the quality of their sleep, versus just 4 percent of the control group. Sleep deprived? Here’s Your One Day-Plan for Better Sleep.
Thatcher came to power when I was in my 20s. I was from a working class home on Merseyside, and felt obliged to call myself a socialist. Then I became a policy researcher by trade, and all the analysis I did confirmed that Thatcher was - at least broadly - correct. But I was now a member of the (Islington) Labour Party, so felt obliged to still call myself a socialist. I'm quite old now, and it's a considerable relief to be able to finally say: Thatcher was - at least broadly - correct.
A 2014 Korean study examined the direct link between drinking rooibos tea and stress-induced weight gain. The researchers found that aspalathin inhibits the release of the stress hormone known as cortisol. High levels of cortisol result in feelings of hunger and increased fat storage. The fact that rooibos blocks this chemical means you can drink this tea when you're stressed out to prevent binge eating.

Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab
Mansour, M. S., Ni, Y.-M., Roberts, A. L., Kelleman, M., RoyChoudhury, A., & St-Onge, M.-P. (2013, October 1). Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism, 61(10), 1347–1352. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408800/
×