At breakfast, go ahead and drink orange juice. But throughout the rest of the day, focus on water instead of juice or soda. The average American consumes an extra 245 calories a day from soft drinks. That’s nearly 90,000 calories a year—or 25 pounds! And research shows that despite the calories, sugary drinks don’t trigger a sense of fullness the way that food does.
If hunger and cravings (especially after meals) are a problem for you in your attempt to maintain a healthy weight, remember to eat your leafy greens! You’ll not only be feeding your body with the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet, you’ll be regulating your appetite hormones in beneficial ways. While there are no thylakoid supplements yet on the market in the U.S., eating large servings of green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale will automatically increase your intake of this natural appetite suppressant. Nutrition experts like Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of the classic nutrition guide Eat to Live, for instance, recommend you eat at least one pound (16 oz.) of green leafy vegetables every day for optimal health and weight control. He may be onto something! Besides suppressing your appetite with leafy greens, there are a lot of additional weight loss tips natural health practitioners share with patients. You can read about ten of the top natural weight loss tips here.
If you're not a coffee drinker and get sick of water easily, try sipping on a cup of hot green tea. Green tea can help you to stop mindlessly snacking, and nutritionists say that the catechins in green tea help to inhibit the movement of glucose into fat cells, which slows the rise of blood sugar and prevents high insulin and subsequent fat storage. And when your blood sugar is more stable so is your hunger!
Increasing your daily fiber intake can help you prevent weight gain—and possibly even encourage weight loss—according to research out of Brigham Young University in Utah. Over the course of the two-year study, the researchers found that people who increased their fiber intake generally lost weight and those who decreased the fiber in their diets gained. Adding fiber-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains, helps you feel satisfied on fewer calories; plus, filling up on high-fiber foods usually means crowding out less-healthy, higher-calorie choices.
Yes, but probably not as much as you might hope. A review of studies on five major FDA-approved prescription medications for obesity, including orlistat, shows that any of them work better than a placebo for helping people lose at least 5% of their body weight over the course of a year. Phentermine-topiramate and liraglutide had the highest odds of making that happen.
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