Each tea has its own special benefit, but just the act of drinking tea can be good for you, too: when you’re on a diet, you want to ensure that you definitely get those eight cups of water per day. Caffeine-free teas —or more properly teasans (infusions made from plants other than camellia sinensis), can create a feeling of fullness and help you keep your diet on track. Don’t make your healthy drink harmful, though. "To further promote weight loss, try to avoid using heavy creamers or whole milk and refined sugars," Dr. Verma explains. What to know what teas are best for weight loss? Read on to find out.
Although many herbs used in herbal teas are generally recognized as safe, always chat with your doctor before using herbal tea for weight loss, especially if you’re breast-feeding. The safety of some herbs, such as chamomile and ginger, has not been established for breast-feeding women or individuals with kidney or liver disease. Furthermore, some herbs -- when consumed in high amounts -- may interact with certain medications.
Fancy coffee drinks from trendy coffee joints often pack several hundred calories, thanks to whole milk, whipped cream, sugar, and sugary syrups. A cup of regular coffee with skim milk has just a small fraction of those calories. And when brewed with good beans, it tastes just as great. You can also try nonfat powdered milk in coffee. You’ll get the nutritional benefits of skim milk, which is high in calcium and low in calories. And, because the water has been removed, powdered milk doesn’t dilute the coffee the way skim milk does. Here are 11 metabolism myths you have to stop believing.
I recommend juicing and fresh veggie/fruit drinks to clients who are professional athlete who have a hard time eating the amount of produce they need for fuel and recovery. But for my clients who exercise an hour a day or less, who are trying to lose weight, whole fruits and veggies are a much better way to meet their bodies needs and feel full after meals and snacks.
Here we take basic lasagna ingredients--ricotta cheese, pasta and tomatoes--and skip the layering and long baking time to make a super-quick and satisfying meal for the whole family. To cut down on prep time, look for presliced mushrooms. For meat lovers, brown some crumbled turkey sausage along with the onions and garlic. Serve with: Steamed broccoli and whole-grain baguette.

Get spicy! According to recent research published in the journal Physiology & Behavior, just half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper can boost metabolism and cause the body to burn an extra 10 calories on its own. Not to mention that for those who don't regularly eat spicy meals, adding cayenne pepper cuts an average of 60 calories from their next meal. Do that at two meals a day for a month and you'll lose 4 pounds without even trying!


Apples of all varieties and types help suppress hunger for a number of reasons. First, apples are filled with soluble fiber and pectin, which help you feel full. Apples also regulate your glucose and boost your energy level. Finally, apples require lots of chewing time, which helps slow you down and gives your body more time to realize that you're no longer hungry. Plus, they just taste good!


A 2014 Taiwanese study analyzed the effect of hibiscus tea extract in increasing weight loss. Researchers examined 26 individuals over a 12-week period. The results showed that participants who took hibiscus tea extract lost more weight than control groups. The hibiscus ingredients also reduced serum free fatty acid (FFA), demonstrating the tea's ability to reduce fat storage.
Enjoy the rich flavor of sweet potatoes? While home on Sundays, cook up a batch. Wrap each one in foil and bake for about an hour at 425 degrees F, or until their luscious, sweet juices start to ooze out into the foil. At work the following week, just pop one in the microwave for a quick warm-up. They’re loaded with taste, so they don’t need any extra toppings. If you want a little zest, swirl in a teaspoon or two of no-salt-added Dijon mustard or a quarter cup of plain nonfat Greek yogurt.
Appetite suppressants work by tricking your brain into believing that you are not hungry and that your stomach is full. One way that they do this is by increasing the levels of the ‘feel-good’ hormone serotonin, which is responsible for regulating your mood, appetite and sleep patterns, amongst other things. If your brain thinks you are full, you won’t feel hungry, and therefore you are likely to eat less. 
Yes, but probably not as much as you might hope. A review of studies on five major FDA-approved prescription medications for obesity, including orlistat, shows that any of them work better than a placebo for helping people lose at least 5% of their body weight over the course of a year. Phentermine-topiramate and liraglutide had the highest odds of making that happen.
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