Goji tea cranks up calorie burn by 10%. Lycium barbarum, the plant from which gojis are harvested, is a traditional Asian medicinal therapy for diabetes, but it also boasts a slimming effect. In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, participants were either given a single dose of L. barbarum or a placebo after a meal. The researchers found that one hour after the dose, the goji group was burning calories at a rate 10 percent higher than the placebo group. The effects lasted up to four hours! Most goji teas are mixed with green tea, further boosting your calorie burn.
Butternut squash and sweet potato are rich in calcium, so no need to worry about ditching dairy products. Broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family and are cancer-fighting superheroes. Green leafy vegetables like kale, collard greens, and spinach will boost your iron levels and if you eat them with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, vitamin C will accelerate your iron absorption.
I first learned about the weight-loss power of tea when my mother fell victim to diabetes. A former nurse back in Korea, she urged me to look into Eastern remedies when it became clear that Western science couldn’t help her. And time and again, as I pored through the studies, the same answer kept popping up: tea. What I learned in my research, and collected in my new book, The 7-Day Flat Belly Tea Cleanse, in which test panelists lost up to 10 pounds in just one week, was that certain teas not only melt fat by boosting metabolism, but can actually prevent our bodies from forming new fat cells.
One of the most recommended beverages for weight loss, green tea is packed with powerful antioxidants called catechins and Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).  These antioxidants boost metabolism and have been linked with increased weight loss and decreased belly fat. Green tea is considered one of the healthiest beverages on the planet and is believed to provide many health benefits, including cancer prevention. Green tea is made from the apical leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis.
There is no doubt that a well­-balanced vegetarian diet is the healthiest way to eat. The reason is simple: it’s easy to digest and boosts your metabolism. A vegetarian diet has all the necessary components like calcium, minerals, protein, and vitamins required for the healthy functioning of your body. A wholesome vegetarian diet will keep you away from diseases and deficiencies. It balances your cholesterol levels, boosts your energy, and keeps digestion disorders at bay. The lifespan of a vegetarian is said to be higher than that of a non-­vegetarian. Thus, doctors often prescribe a vegetarian lifestyle as a part of the treatment of various diseases.

You might very well eat processed chips, cereal, energy bars and pasta as the bulk of your diet and still be heavier than someone following an omnivorous diet consisting of lean meats and leafy greens. Long-term vegetarians, though, do tend to have less body fat and lower cholesterol than meat eaters, reported a study in Nutrition Research and Practice published in 2012.


YES! Nuts provide important HEALTHY fats we need, and are high in vegan protein. Raw nuts provide important enzymes we need. Toasted nuts tend to taste a little more interesting and make the protein more available for your body. So I recommend eating some raw nuts and some toasted nuts to get the best of both worlds. Just don't go crazy with them -- 1/4 cup nuts per day if weight loss is your goal;


While you may already know that dark leafy greens—like kale or spinach—are some of the most nutrient-dense foods in the world, it’s unlikely you’re aware of a compound in these veggies that acts as a natural appetite suppressant. Swedish researchers recently discovered that sac-like structures called thylakoids, which are abundant in green leafy vegetables, decrease feelings of hunger and increase satiety. By acting as a natural appetite suppressant, thylakoids could help you lose weight naturally, according the research published in the medical journal Appetite.[1] 

Mate tea is known for its powerful thermogenic effects—meaning it turns up your body’s calorie burning mechanism—and can also promote weight loss by improving insulin sensitivity. In a recent study, participants were divided into two groups. One group took a placebo 60 minutes prior to exercising, while the other group ingested 1000 mg capsule of yerba maté. Researchers found that those who consumed the herb increased the beneficial effects their workout had on their metabolism without the workout. Plus, this brew is like green tea on steroids, with up to 90 percent more powerful cancer-fighting antioxidants, a cache of B vitamins, and plenty of chromium, which helps stabilize blood-sugar levels.
So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal of Hypertension. Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function. And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.
Made from pulverized green tea leaves, you stir matcha into hot water. Therefore, you consume the whole tea leaf. For that reason, you get a bigger dose of ECGC. One study from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs compared the two and found that drinking matcha delivered 137 times the metabolism-revving ECGC compared to traditional green tea. One tip: if you find matcha to be too bitter on its own, foam it into milk and stir with honey for a delicious matcha latte. (If you need some more convincing, here’s some more information on how incredible matcha is as a weight-loss tea.)

Notes: Defrost the shrimp under cool running water and pat dry. In a nonstick pan over medium-high heat, toss the shrimp with a little all-natural cooking spray, and cook until bright pink, tightly furled, and warmed through. Chop and steam the carrots and broccoli until tender-crisp, about 5 minutes for the carrots, 3 minutes for the broccoli. Drizzle everything with the teriyaki sauce and sprinkle with the sesame seeds.
To make sure you're getting enough, try tracking your intake (even briefly) with an app like My Fitness Pal. Another strategy is to include more pulses (the umbrella term for beans, lentils, and peas) in your meals, since they are one of the best sources of plant protein. One cup of cooked lentils contains 17 grams of protein, compared to about 8 grams in a cup of cooked quinoa or a quarter cup of almonds. Whipping a plant-based powder (such as pea protein, made from yellow split peas) into a smoothie can also boost your intake, by as much as 25 grams per serving.
Prep foods in advance. To make sure you stick to your diet plan, organize your meals in advance. You can do this after dinner in the evening. Lay out the foods you'll eat for breakfast so they are ready to go when you wake up. Then pack your lunch and snacks for the next day. Finally, do any meal prep for the next night's healthy dinner so that it's easy to throw together when you come home from work.
For dinner, stir fry tempeh or tofu with minimal oil and serve with a mound of roasted vegetables, or steam the veggies and spritz with lemon juice. A small serving of whole grains, such as quinoa or wild rice, or a starchy vegetable round out the meal. The size of your servings depends on how many calories you've figured you need daily to achieve your goal. Or try one of these vegetarian dinner recipes:
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 65 percent of American adults age 20 and up are overweight or obese, but the prevalence of obesity among vegetarians and vegans is below 10 percent. On average, the body weights of both male and female vegetarians are three percent to 20 percent lower than omnivores. Research has also found that switching to a healthy vegan diet leads to weight loss, even without changes to exercise or limits on portion size, calories, or carbohydrates. And, studies have found an increase in calorie burn after vegan meals, meaning plant-based foods may be used more efficiently as fuel for the body, as opposed to being stored as fat—pretty powerful support for a plant-based diet. But in my years of private practice I’ve also seen people gain weight by going vegetarian, when they don’t get the right balance. Here are some veggie dos and don’t’s: 
Who says you shouldn’t eat less than 1800 kcals? Under normal circumstances, the minimum is 1200 for women, 1500 for men, and height and weight have no bearing – these are what the body requires to avoid starvation. This diet is, however, for 7 days only, it is not intended as a long-term weight-loss strategy, so 6 days at less than 1500 won’t do you any harm. You don’t say how tall you are, or what you do for a living, which would also have a bearing on your long-term weight-loss plans. Good luck with it, anyway – it’s not easy

So today I wanted to share with you some easy vegan recipes for weight loss. If you are on a similar journey as me then hopefully you find some scrumptious deliciousness here. I’ve selected recipes that are low in calories but will help bulk up your plate and I’ve listed the calories per serving for your convenience. To view the full recipe click on the picture or the title of the recipe.


I'm on a weight loss journey, hoping to eventually lose a total of 139lbs. I lost an initial 17lbs and then stalled, so decided to try a weight loss supplement and because of good reviews from other buyers I chose this product. I have previously used phentermine with success and was hoping for a similar product. Thermogenic Burn has worked well for me so far, allowing me to push past the stall and I've now lost a total of 36 lbs (30 lbs difference pictured) in two months. It works to suppress appetite and increase energy, though I think it suppresses appetite more than anything else. Negative thing would only be that I do need to take it with my meals because it causes nausea if I don't. But I don't mind that because if you don't consume enough calories daily your body goes into starvation mode slowing down weight loss and usually making it easier to put the weight back on. So it forces me to eat at least two meals daily but completely diminishes any desire to snack in between. I would reccomend this product and have already.

There's lots of hype around tea's benefits—especially when it comes to drinking tea and weight loss. Next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world, and for good reason. Tea is a versatile beverage that can be served hot or cold. Tea also comes in a variety of flavors and it can help quench thirst, wake you up or help you relax. While there are many varieties sold at the store, true teas include green, oolong, black and white. Each true tea is derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, but the tea leaves are processed differently, which accounts for different colors, flavors and health benefits. But can drinking tea actually help you lose weight?

Essential oils have many health benefits, but one in particular, grapefruit essential oil, may also serve as a natural appetite suppressant. “Grapefruit contains a powerful compound called nootkatone that has been shown to activate AMPK, an enzyme involved in energy metabolism and appetite control,” Dr. Axe says. “For this reason, grapefruit essential oil is often used as a natural way to reduce appetite and amp up weight loss.” His advice? “Add a few drops of grapefruit essential oil to your water, use it in a diffuser, or apply topically to your chest and wrists to ward off cravings.” Check out these other 23 tricks to flatten your belly—without a lick of exercise.
Popular weight loss pills — like guarana, garcinia cambogia or ephedrine — are often used to suppress one’s appetite and help with weight loss. But it’s fairly common to experience some side effects when taking these products, including jitteriness, anxiety, trouble sleeping, indigestion, diarrhea, rapid heartbeat or headaches, which is why natural appetite suppressants are always better options.
Jumpstart your weight loss journey with this two-week tea cleanse that aids in digestion and helps reduce bloating. It contains all natural ingredients like herbs that boost metabolism to burn calories. When used consistently for 14 days every morning, while also working out, consumers can expect to see results. Along with a flatter belly, consumers will experience increased energy, with surpassed appetite and a calmer mind.
Consuming bilberries, a northern European cousin to the blueberry, may help reduce bloat-inducing inflammation, according to a study published in the journal *Molecular Nutrition & Food Research*. To come to these findings, researchers divided participants into two groups; one group was given a diet that included an equivalent of 1.5 cups of blueberries, while the other group followed a control diet that didn’t include the fruit. At the end of the experiment, the bilberry-eating group had significantly less inflammation than their counterparts who didn’t munch on the berry. Since the fruit is native to Northern Europe, it isn’t widely available in the US. To reap the benefits, enjoy a few cups of bilberry tea.

While manufacturers of weight loss pills continue to promote the convenience and rapid results associated with their products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other health authorities warn against their use. Some of the main reasons that appetite-suppressing weight loss pills are considered to be at least somewhat dangerous include medication interactions, tainted or unlisted ingredients, high amounts of caffeine, and fillers or synthetic additives that cause negative reactions, just to name few.
×