It’s stunning how often we eat out of boredom, nervousness, habit, or frustration—so often, in fact, that many of us have actually forgotten what physical hunger feels like. If you’re hankering for a specific food, it’s probably a craving, not hunger. If you’d eat anything you could get your hands on, chances are you’re truly hungry. Learn how to recognize these feelings mistaken for hunger, then find ways other than eating to express love, tame stress, and relieve boredom. But talk to your doctor if you think you’re always hungry for a medical reason. Here are 10 medical reasons you might be hungry.
Oolong tea’s major weapon against weight gain is its ability to prevent fat absorption. Japanese scientists found that high levels of antioxidants called polymerized polyphenols, specific to oolong tea, inhibit the body’s ability to absorb fat by up to 20 percent. When Taiwanese researchers studied more than 1,100 people over a 10-year period, they determined that those who drank black, green or oolong tea one or more times a week had nearly 20 percent less body fat than those who drank none. And oolong tea fights blood pressure, cutting the risk by as much as a whopping 65 percent! Want to turn up your fat burning oven even more? Check out these Foods that Burn Belly Fat and Help Speed Weight Loss.
Incorporating fragrant seasonings into each meal, like fresh grated ginger, fresh mint, cinnamon, rosemary and basil, is one of the core philosophies in my newest book S.A.S.S! Yourself Slim. In addition to adding flavor and antioxidants, aromatic foods may also help you eat less. In one study, when subjects had the ability to control their own dessert portions, they ate 5-10 percent less of stronger smelling selections.
Of vinegar or apple cider vinegar, that is (just make sure you drink it the right way). It may serve as an appetite suppressant, although the studies are mixed. One study suggests that it is the unpleasant taste that causes our appetite to cease fire. Participants who drank vinegar with breakfast ate less than their counterparts who didn’t. The reason? They were nauseated. Decide for yourself whether appetite suppressants like that are worth it. You could also try one of these other 14 tips for controlling your strongest food cravings.
This detox tea stands out because not only does it promote healthy digestion and helps the body eliminate harmful toxins, but it also stimulates the body’s ability to process excess fats. Complete with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, it contains all natural ingredients without the laxative Senna, so it’s easy insensitive stomachs. Expect bloating to be reduced, energy boosted, and plus it tastes great.

There's lots of hype around tea's benefits—especially when it comes to drinking tea and weight loss. Next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world, and for good reason. Tea is a versatile beverage that can be served hot or cold. Tea also comes in a variety of flavors and it can help quench thirst, wake you up or help you relax. While there are many varieties sold at the store, true teas include green, oolong, black and white. Each true tea is derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, but the tea leaves are processed differently, which accounts for different colors, flavors and health benefits. But can drinking tea actually help you lose weight?
In order to help you slim down and optimize your health, vegetarian or vegan meals should contain plenty of vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and healthy plant-based fats like avocado. I’ve met tons of “junk food vegetarians and vegans” who don’t eat the minimum recommended servings of produce and live on highly processed foods like faux pepperoni pizza, veggie hot dogs, vegan cookies, candy, and ice cream. It’s not just about getting the animal-based ingredients out; it’s also about eating whole, nutrient-rich foods.    
Prep foods in advance. To make sure you stick to your diet plan, organize your meals in advance. You can do this after dinner in the evening. Lay out the foods you'll eat for breakfast so they are ready to go when you wake up. Then pack your lunch and snacks for the next day. Finally, do any meal prep for the next night's healthy dinner so that it's easy to throw together when you come home from work.
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This supplement’s ingredient list may look like one with the intent to burn fat and increase your energy and stamina. But, while it likely will have those effects, the manufacturer includes a proprietary blend of nutrients fat burning blend that includes several appetite suppressants as well. These include mango, green coffee bean extract, green tea leaf, caffeine, and acai berries.
A study published in Advances in Nutrition found that catechins boost the liver's ability to burn body fat into energy. The study examined participants who worked out at least 25 minutes every day. During the study, half of the participants consumed four to five cups of tea per day. The participants that drank green tea lost an average of 2 pounds more than those that only exercised.
Tea, specifically green tea, has been touted for its ability to boost metabolism. While tea does contain caffeine and catechins (natural antioxidants said to increase energy expenditure and burn fat), research shows mixed results regarding the use of tea for weight loss and weight maintenance. A 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity linked catechins in tea to a modest—about three pounds over 12 weeks—weight loss. However, a more recent review study found drinking green tea was not associated with significant weight loss. And, since many studies used concentrations of catechins much greater than what you would get from drinking green tea, further research is needed to support claims of tea aiding in weight loss through increased metabolism. The upside? Drinking unsweetened tea does help keep you hydrated, which can assist with weight loss by preventing overeating caused by mistaking thirst for hunger.
3. Go with natural foods. Our ancestors never saw refined food, and the less you see of it, the better. Focus on minimally processed natural foods, meaning more grains and less refined grains and sugars. Gradually boost your fiber intake to at least 25-30 grams. Whole grains and vegetables contain insoluble fibers that promote healthy digestion, while the soluble fibers in fruits, oats and cooked dried beans and peas lower cholesterol and keep blood sugar steady, helping prevent heart disease and diabetes. Both kinds help control weight.
If you tend to eat on-the-go and gobble down your food, work on s-l-o-w-i-n-g it down. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that eating too quickly curtails the release of hormones that induce feelings of fullness, which can trigger mindless overeating. Another University of Rhode Island study found that slow eaters take in about four times fewer calories per minute, and experience a higher level of satiety, despite eating less food.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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