Herbal teas, which can be made using a variety of different herbs such as cinnamon, ginger root, chamomile and red raspberry leaf, contain just 2 calories per cup. A study published in 2010 in the “Journal for Nurse Practitioners” reports that herbal teas support weight loss by minimizing poor dietary choices and decreasing consumption of high-calorie, sugary beverages. In addition, they can help reduce the calorie content of soups when used as soup stock.

Black tea is the most processed of the true teas. The leaves are oxidized, resulting in the deep, rick black hue of the tea. There are tons of different types of black teas, but the most common are Assam, Darjeeling, Earl Grey, and breakfast teas. Research shows that black tea is an effective weight loss aid due to the presence of flavones. These antioxidants help to prevent cardiovascular disease and can lower body mass index.


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 65 percent of American adults age 20 and up are overweight or obese, but the prevalence of obesity among vegetarians and vegans is below 10 percent. On average, the body weights of both male and female vegetarians are three percent to 20 percent lower than omnivores. Research has also found that switching to a healthy vegan diet leads to weight loss, even without changes to exercise or limits on portion size, calories, or carbohydrates. And, studies have found an increase in calorie burn after vegan meals, meaning plant-based foods may be used more efficiently as fuel for the body, as opposed to being stored as fat—pretty powerful support for a plant-based diet. But in my years of private practice I’ve also seen people gain weight by going vegetarian, when they don’t get the right balance. Here are some veggie dos and don’t’s: 
Technically, it's true that "satiereal" is an ingredient that's extracted from plants, but just because something is "natural" or "plant-based" doesn't mean that it's good for you. Satiereal is derived from saffron, which is a spice that Ayurvedic healers believe can fight certain diseases, boost your mood, and make your skin glow, among other things.
You probably think that vegetable juice is just a way to get more veggies in your diet, right? That's true, but veggie juice has also been shown to fill you up. In fact, when people drank vegetable juice before a meal, they ended up eating 135 fewer calories. Now that's some appetite suppression! Just be sure to drink the low-sodium varieties, which are less likely to make you bloat.
This is the type of tea that's often served in Chinese restaurants and used to make iced tea. It’s fermented -- a process that allows it to change chemically and often increases its caffeine content. The tea has a strong, rich flavor. Whether it helps with weight loss isn't certain. But research done on rats suggests substances called polyphenols in black tea might help block fat from being absorbed in the intestines.
Obtained from the flowers of M chamomilla, chamomile tea is loaded with antioxidants and beneficial nutrients, including anti-obesity properties. The tea has anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, sleep-inducing, and anti-anxiety properties. Hence, drinking this herbal tea can help promote sleep, relieve anxiety and depression, which can cause overeating and result in weight gain.
If you are a hardcore meat eater and want to switch to a vegetarian diet, it is always better to seek the advice of a doctor first. He/She can guide you to make a lifestyle change suitably, and it will become easier to switch to a vegetarian diet. There may be initial hiccups in the form of constipation or irritable bowels, but hang on. Following a vegetarian diet helps one stay fit and disease-free for life and also increases his/her lifespan. A plant-based diet is not only good for your body but is also environment-friendly.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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