While you may already know that dark leafy greens—like kale or spinach—are some of the most nutrient-dense foods in the world, it’s unlikely you’re aware of a compound in these veggies that acts as a natural appetite suppressant. Swedish researchers recently discovered that sac-like structures called thylakoids, which are abundant in green leafy vegetables, decrease feelings of hunger and increase satiety. By acting as a natural appetite suppressant, thylakoids could help you lose weight naturally, according the research published in the medical journal Appetite.[1] 
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Also some research shows that the human body is primed to consume most of its calories during daylight hours. But the lifestyle is problematic for many: Because family meals and dinners with friends often are scheduled for after sunset, "people who try to stop eating after 7pm can’t do it every day for the rest of their lives," says Dr. Seltzer, who supports an alternative strategy: Eating a hearty meal at your regular dinnertime.
When you drink liquid carbs, like the sugar in soda, your body doesn't register them the same way as, say, a piece of bread, according to a review of studies published in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care. That means, even though you're taking in calories, your fullness cues aren't likely to signal that you're satisfied once you finish off a can. And that can lead to consuming more overall.
Lots of people have, for their entire lives, used food as a reward. To restrict their own reward, and then not be allowed to have their reward after they succeed is tough. It’s like going into an apathetic void of brain fog and sadness. And sure, you can rewire your habits over time and eventually your body will self-regulate so hunger won’t be an issue anymore, but it takes time. This period is a trial by fire where many people fail.
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