You might very well eat processed chips, cereal, energy bars and pasta as the bulk of your diet and still be heavier than someone following an omnivorous diet consisting of lean meats and leafy greens. Long-term vegetarians, though, do tend to have less body fat and lower cholesterol than meat eaters, reported a study in Nutrition Research and Practice published in 2012.

So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal of Hypertension. Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function. And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.


This supplement is the #1 best seller on Amazon for carb blockers, but we think the appetite suppressant is the better selling point. It has 1000 mg of Garcinia Cambogia and potassium, chromium, and calcium to make sure your body is suppressing your appetite, all while avoiding the possible negative side effects of dieting. And with its unique formula, this supplement is designed for maximum absorption.
Researchers at the University of Illinois Medical School examined the science behind this discovery. The scientists examined 3193 overweight volunteers with an average weight of 217 pounds. The participants were given inhalers that contained peppermint and were instructed to use it every two hours over a 6-month period.  The participants who consistently used the inhalers lost and average of 2% body weight each month.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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