Dr. Kohnke and his team then tested thylakoid in humans and found that it also acts as a natural appetite suppressant in normal-weight people.[3] Eleven subjects ate a high-fat meal (a sandwich with thylakoid-rich pesto or regular pesto). Afterwards, levels of three different appetite signaling hormones were altered in those given the thylakoid-rich sandwiches. Two hours after the meal, they showed significant increases in the satiety hormone cholecystokinin compared to those who did not eat a thylakoid-rich sandwich. They also had reduced levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue (fat cells) that tells you you’re hungry. Six hours after the meal, they had significant increases in ghrelin’s opposite hormone—leptin—which also control’s appetite by telling you you’re full. The fact that thylakoid increased leptin levels in the blood six hours after eating is important because leptin is crucial for regulating calorie intake between meals and over longer periods of time.
Consuming bilberries, a northern European cousin to the blueberry, may help reduce bloat-inducing inflammation, according to a study published in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. To come to these findings, researchers divided participants into two groups; one group was given a diet that included an equivalent of 1.5 cups of blueberries, while the other group followed a control diet that didn’t include the fruit. At the end of the experiment, the bilberry-eating group had significantly less inflammation than their counterparts who didn’t munch on the berry. Since the fruit is native to Northern Europe, it isn’t widely available in the US. To reap the benefits, enjoy a few cups of bilberry tea.
Hunger is your body's way of communicating that you need to eat food. Your body gets energy from nutrients in foods. Without energy, your body cannot function, so it's vitally important to pay attention to those cues. Lots of diet foods and strategies are designed to convince your body that you're full, so you eat less and subsequently lose weight. But, over time, eating foods that trick you into feeling full can lead to binging, overeating, and malnutrition. For example, if you eat appetite-suppression crackers all day, you might feel full, but you'll also be depriving yourself of other nutrients. The same goes for sucking on these lollipops all day.
Directions: Rinse 1 cup of quinoa in cold water. In a medium saucepan, combine quinoa with 1 tablespoon curry powder and 1 teaspoon turmeric. Add 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer until the water is absorbed—about 15 minutes. Stir in 1 cup shredded carrots and 1 cup cubed firm tofu. Makes about 4 one-cup servings. Refrigerate remaining servings for an easy, healthy snack or meal later in the week.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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