Eating a high-fiber diet — similar to the Mediterranean diet or the way that those known for longevity living in the Blue Zones eat — has been linked to a longer life span, better regulation of healthy body weight, improved gut/digestive health, hormonal health and much more. According to research in the Obesity Reports, “Evidence points to a significant association between a lack of fiber intake and: ischemic heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, overweight and obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, as well as gastrointestinal disorders.” (10)
Green tea is kind of trendy these days largely because of the many health benefits that it provides. Among them is green tea’s role as a natural appetite suppressant. “Green tea extract affects two important peptide hormones, norepinephrine and dopamine, which activate the sympathetic nervous system,” Dr. Axe says. “Together, these two hormones are called catecholamines and are well known for their ability to suppress appetite.” In particular, green tea contains a powerful compound called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) that is thought to prevent the breakdown of catecholamines, leading to a reduction in appetite, he explains.
Chamomile tea is obtained from the flowers of M. chamomilla (10). It has anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, sleep-inducing, and anti-anxiety properties (11), (12). Depression, anxiety, inflammation, and sleep deprivation have a direct relation to weight gain. Scientists have found that the presence of phenolic compounds, such as quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, patuletin, and their glucosides, in chamomile tea is responsible for its anti-obesity properties (13). A study also showed that chamomile tea could lower blood sugar levels (14).
One of the most recommended beverages for weight loss, green tea is packed with powerful antioxidants called catechins and Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).  These antioxidants boost metabolism and have been linked with increased weight loss and decreased belly fat. Green tea is considered one of the healthiest beverages on the planet and is believed to provide many health benefits, including cancer prevention. Green tea is made from the apical leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis.
When you are stressed, your body kicks up production of the hormone cortisol. “High levels of cortisol can lead to an accumulation of abdominal fat as well as other chronic health problems,” says New York City nutritionist Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, the founder of Nutritious Life. Cortisol also causes the body to form a resistance to leptin—a hormone that sends the signal to the brain that you are full, she says. “The more stressed you are, the more cortisol you secrete, and the less able you are to tell when you are full.” There’s more to it too, she says. “During times of stress, we tend to crave high sugar, high carbohydrate foods that produce serotonin and make us feel calm and in control. So, reducing stress will help reduce these cravings.” She suggests carving out a few minutes to practice deep breathing each day. “Close your eyes, clear your mind, and breathe slowly in through your nose and out through your mouth,” she says.
A vegan meal plan can also help support any weight loss efforts. A balanced, nutrient-packed vegan diet is rich in fibrous foods, that will satiate you, keep bad cholesterol in check and have your metabolism humming like a well-oiled engine. When going vegan it’s important to incorporate more plant-based protein into your diet and sometimes supplement your vitamin B12 levels, which have a tendency to be low in an unbalanced vegan meal plan.
While there are probably plenty of pre-made bean and veggie soup options that just need a few minutes to heat through on the stovetop, making your own soup is really easy—and a great idea for your health. Homemade soups are much lower in sodium – about 100 milligrams or less per 2-cup serving. By contrast, 2 cups of many canned soups contain a blood-pressure-busting 1,200 milligrams or more, a worrisome amount considering that health experts recommend consuming no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium for the entire day. This is also a great way to use up all those leftover vegetables in your crisper—pretty much anything works in this soup.
Thank you so much for that! So great to see not only delicious, but healthier options as well. Already tried stuffed portobellos and they turned out amazing. Also added your baked crumbled tofu to large salads and wow- that was game changer. I am hoping that maybe one day you could make a oil free and weight loss recipes book. Would be such a great addition to your current one!
So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal of Hypertension. Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function. And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.

Just a handful of almonds is a rich source of antioxidants, vitamin E, and magnesium. Almonds have also been shown to increase feelings of fullness in people and help with weight management, according to a study presented at The 2006 Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting. So what are you waiting for? Nosh on almonds for your next healthy snack! [Click to Tweet this!]
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