I've had plenty of clients who believed it was okay to eat unlimited amounts of plant-based treats (think coconut milk ice cream and sweet potato chips). Plant-based frozen foods, desserts, and snacks can not only be high in calories, but they're often made with refined flour and added sugar, and stripped of nutrients and fiber. While they're fine as occasional treats, when consumed daily, they can pack on pounds. One study found that processed foods may decrease post-meal calorie burning by nearly 50% compared to whole foods. Trade processed plant foods for fresh snacks. Reach for in-season fruit and dark chocolate to satisfy a sweet craving; and raw veggies with hummus or guacamole for a savory fix.
Most people tend to associate a vegan diet with being lean. And science backs that notion. In a study of 40,000 adults, Oxford University researchers found that meat-eaters had the highest BMIs; vegans had the lowest; and vegetarians and semi-vegetarians landed somewhere in-between. But throughout my years in private practice, I've worked with plenty of clients who did not lose weight after cutting out animal products. And some even gained weight. Here are five common reasons this happens, plus how to avoid them—so you can reap both the health and weight-loss benefits of going vegan.
Before we venture into the plant-astic world of foods to avoid, as well as include, on your vegan meal plan for weight loss, it’s important to understand the distinction between being vegan and eating a plant-based diet. While being vegan does mean consuming plant-based foods, following a plant-based diet doesn’t necessarily mean you’re vegan. Confused? Read on.
Butternut squash and sweet potato are rich in calcium, so no need to worry about ditching dairy products. Broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family and are cancer-fighting superheroes. Green leafy vegetables like kale, collard greens, and spinach will boost your iron levels and if you eat them with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, vitamin C will accelerate your iron absorption.
You've been hearing it since you were in grade school, but breaking the fast, the origin of the word breakfast, is a rule to live by. In addition to jump-starting your metabolism, a morning meal has a ripple effect on your intake. Breakfast skippers eat 40 percent more sweets, 55 percent more soda, 45 percent fewer vegetables and 30 percent less fruit than those who eat breakfast. In addition, breakfast skippers are 4.5 times more likely to be overweight.
Studies found that people who keep food diaries wind up eating about 15 percent less food than those who don’t. Watch out for weekends: A University of North Carolina study found people tend to consume an extra 115 calories per weekend day, primarily from alcohol and fat.  Then cut out or down calories from spreads, dressings, sauces, condiments, drinks, and snacks; they could make the difference between weight gain and loss. Here are 50 easy ways to lose weight naturally.

Star anise, the fruit of a small evergreen tree (Illicium verum) native to China, can be used in the treatment of digestive troubles such an upset stomach, diarrhea, nausea etc. One may drink a tea made from it by steeping a whole pod in one cup of hot water for 10 minutes. Strain this and sweeten it if required. Sip on this slowly when an upset stomach occurs.


Pros: People (genuine reviewers) have lost nearly 6 lbs in just 7 days of doing this cleanse! I loved the fact that it does not contain senna, so there is no laxative effect. I too lost weight but I won’t attribute that to this product alone. Overall – it is a great cleansing tea if you like stronger tea with caffeine, and you get a whole month supply (28 bags). Definitely one of the best teas for weight loss I tried.

Pu Erh tea is named after the town Pu’er in the Yunnan province in China. And guess what – this tea is also obtained from Camellia sinensis. This is a specially fermented tea and is also known as black tea. Scientists have found that Pu Erh tea has lipid-lowering properties, and it helps reduce weight in patients with metabolic syndrome (28), (29).


Everything is good about a vegetarian diet. It includes wholesome and balanced foods that get digested easily and boost metabolism. A vegetarian diet is often the best solution to combat chronic disorders, obesity, allergies, blood pressure, and skin diseases. It lowers the risk of cancer and helps women with hormonal imbalances. People who opt for a vegetarian diet have higher energy and are less prone to diseases that originate from being overweight. Vegetarians are also calmer and live a longer, healthier life when compared to non-­vegetarians. Consuming nutritious, fibrous, and antioxidant-­rich meals is the best way to achieve good health.
You've been hearing it since you were in grade school, but breaking the fast, the origin of the word breakfast, is a rule to live by. In addition to jump-starting your metabolism, a morning meal has a ripple effect on your intake. Breakfast skippers eat 40 percent more sweets, 55 percent more soda, 45 percent fewer vegetables and 30 percent less fruit than those who eat breakfast. In addition, breakfast skippers are 4.5 times more likely to be overweight.
Furthermore, insulin levels were reduced in those subjects eating the thylakoid-rich meal, while blood sugar levels remained unchanged. This means less insulin was needed to keep the blood sugar response normal in these healthy individuals. When the insulin response is exaggerated, such as in those with metabolic syndrome, you’re more likely to experience blood sugar swings with episodes of reactive hypoglycemia, leading to increased hunger a couple of hours after eating. Higher insulin responses are also associated with increased belly fat and inflammation, raising the risk of heart disease and other chronic diseases.
Study after study demonstrates how incredibly good for you tea can be: teas have been known to prevent  dental decay, arthritis, strokes and cardiovascular disease, and even cancer. Given all of the amazing health benefits that we’ve discovered are waiting for us in teas, it should be no surprise that they can play a powerful role in supporting weight loss. There are teas that speed up your digestion, reduce your bad cholesterol levels, and can actually help you shrink fat cells. With the guidance of Dr. Deepa Verma, we have selected 10 teas that can assist you in achieving your weight loss goals.
Think you know everything about apples and health? Think again. It turns out that eating an apple a day may do more than keep the doctor away; an apple may serve as a natural appetite suppressant. “The combination of pectin, soluble fiber, high water content, and lots of chewing make apples an excellent appetite-taming food,” Bauer says. Plus, these appetite suppressants are portable and portion-controlled, making them an all-around home run, she says.
Appetite suppressants work by tricking your brain into believing that you are not hungry and that your stomach is full. One way that they do this is by increasing the levels of the ‘feel-good’ hormone serotonin, which is responsible for regulating your mood, appetite and sleep patterns, amongst other things. If your brain thinks you are full, you won’t feel hungry, and therefore you are likely to eat less. 

Many commercial weight-loss plans assign women to a 1,200 calorie per day diet plan. The number might be higher, however, if the woman is physically active. For example, you might see that your weight loss calorie goal is 1,200 calories per day. But if you choose to burn an extra 300 calories per day through exercise, you can eat 1,500 calories and still lose weight.
Calendula tea is obtained from the flowers of the plant Calendula officinalis, also known as calendula or English marigold. Researchers have found that calendula possesses strong anti-inflammatory properties (19). It has a flowery and refreshing taste that can help calm you down and reduce stress. So, calendula tea can help prevent stress and inflammation-induced weight gain.
There's some scientific evidence that compounds in saffron could have beneficial metabolic effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, and potentially impact weight, says Rekha Kumar, MD, endocrinologist at the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "That doesn’t mean putting [saffron] in a lollipop and telling people to eat it is a healthy approach to weight loss, body image, or nutrition," Dr. Kumar says.

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