A vegetarian diet is one of the healthiest approaches to weight loss (1). Plant-based foods such as vegetables, fruits, and whole grains are full of fiber, keep you satiated with fewer calories, and prevent weight gain (2). Additionally, they also reduce the risk of heart diseases (3). So, if you are a vegetarian or want to avoid meat, the 7-day vegetarian weight loss plan will not only help burn fat but also boost your health. In this article, we’ll go through the best 7-day vegetarian diet plan with a calorie breakdown, benefits of the vegetarian diet, and weight loss tips.
Enjoy the rich flavor of sweet potatoes? While home on Sundays, cook up a batch. Wrap each one in foil and bake for about an hour at 425 degrees F, or until their luscious, sweet juices start to ooze out into the foil. At work the following week, just pop one in the microwave for a quick warm-up. They’re loaded with taste, so they don’t need any extra toppings. If you want a little zest, swirl in a teaspoon or two of no-salt-added Dijon mustard or a quarter cup of plain nonfat Greek yogurt.
Healthy fats are an important ingredient required by the body. These fats keep the joints lubricated and makes movements easier. They also help maintain cell integrity and prevent inflammation. You need to have unsaturated fats that can be found in nuts, avocados, and certain other foods. Avoid saturated fat that is usually available in the form of animal meat as it is bad for the body.
Gabel, K., Hoddy, K. K., Haggerty, N., Song, J., Kroeger, C. M., Trepanowski, J. F., … Varady, K. A. (2018, June 15). Effects of 8-hour time restricted feeding on body weight and metabolic disease risk factors in obese adults: A pilot study. Nutrition and Healthy Aging, 4(4), 345–353. Retrieved from https://content.iospress.com/articles/nutrition-and-healthy-aging/nha170036

You've been hearing it since you were in grade school, but breaking the fast, the origin of the word breakfast, is a rule to live by. In addition to jump-starting your metabolism, a morning meal has a ripple effect on your intake. Breakfast skippers eat 40 percent more sweets, 55 percent more soda, 45 percent fewer vegetables and 30 percent less fruit than those who eat breakfast. In addition, breakfast skippers are 4.5 times more likely to be overweight.

Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885

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