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There are a few reasons you might hear sleep experts tell you to have a cup of this weight-loss tea before bed. For one, chamomile can make for an especially soothing part of your wind-down time, which cues your brain and body that you’re ready for sleep. Two, the herbal is caffeine-free, so it won’t keep you up. And three, chamomile has particular medicinal qualities from flavonoids called apigenin that calm nervous system activity to help you drift off without worry. Considering that a full night’s sleep promotes a healthy weight, this is one good-for-your waistline habit you should get behind. (Check out these tips to lose weight while you sleep.)

Ounce for ounce, cheddar packs four times the calories and nine times the fat of skinless chicken breast, which is why I’ve seen new vegetarians gain weight when they trade turkey sandwiches for grilled cheese sandwiches, or rely on pizza and mac and cheese as staples. If you decide to keep dairy in your diet, limit yourself to one cheesy meal per day with a max of one ounce of real, natural, or organic cheese. And stick with 0 percent organic milk or yogurt and plant-based proteins like beans and organic tofu at other meals.
Dietary fibers, whether from food sources or in concentrated supplement form, have been used for hundreds of years to promote fullness, improve gut health and digestive functions, and help maintain strong immunity and heart health. Despite the fact that fiber intake is inversely associated with hunger, body weight and body fat, studies show that the average fiber intake of adults in the United States is still less than half of recommended levels. (9)
It occurred to me that anyone would lose weight if they kept up a similar level of activity and ate like our ancestors did, a concept I developed in a new diet book, The Origin Diet: How Living in Tune With Your Evolutionary Roots Will Reduce Disease, Boost Vitality, Add Healthy Years to Your Life, and Help You Lose Weight (Henry Holt and Company, 2001).
Hibiscus tea is obtained from Hibiscus sabdariffa and is a potent antioxidant (8). Also, it does not contain any caffeine. Scientists have found that drinking this tea can help lower blood pressure, and hence, it is good for those suffering from hypertension. Hypertension causes stress, which, in turn, increases toxins in the body, leading to inflammation. And when your body is in a constant state of inflammation, it prevents fat metabolism, and this leads to weight gain. American scientists have also found that it helps lower LDL-cholesterol and improves blood lipid profile (9).
Ounce for ounce, cheddar packs four times the calories and nine times the fat of skinless chicken breast, which is why I’ve seen new vegetarians gain weight when they trade turkey sandwiches for grilled cheese sandwiches, or rely on pizza and mac and cheese as staples. If you decide to keep dairy in your diet, limit yourself to one cheesy meal per day with a max of one ounce of real, natural, or organic cheese. And stick with 0 percent organic milk or yogurt and plant-based proteins like beans and organic tofu at other meals.
Mansour, M. S., Ni, Y.-M., Roberts, A. L., Kelleman, M., RoyChoudhury, A., & St-Onge, M.-P. (2013, October 1). Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism, 61(10), 1347–1352. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408800/
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