I guess I was born with a good appetite, and have always been a little bigger than the other kids. But as I grew the nurse began to comment on my weight, talked about the My Plate model, and that I should move more and eat less. This sounds so easy, but it wasn’t. I worked hard on food and exercise. Sometimes I exercised several times a day, and sometimes I’d eat nothing, only to go face down in food later just because I was so hungry. It didn’t work. It was almost inhumanely difficult for me to maintain a reasonable weight. As soon as I lost weight, the pounds piled up on me again. Then add the food they served at school and you have a real challenge.

Italian researchers found that drinking a cup of black tea per day improves cardiovascular function—and the more cups you drink, the more you benefit! Better cardiovascular function means you can breeze through that 5K you signed up for. And a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that drinking 20 ounces of black tea daily causes the body to secrete five times more interferon, a key element of your body’s infection-protection arsenal. Just make sure to ditch the dairy. A study in the European Heart Journal found that while black tea can improve blood flow and blood vessel dilation, adding milk to the tea counteracts these effects.


People have been drinking teas for thousands of years, and it’s no wonder why: when something is as tasty and beneficial for your health as tea, the only question is how it could fall out of favor — while it’s the second most popular drink in the world after water, Americans tend to prefer coffee, although the U.S. has been picking up in its consumption lately. Perhaps an increase in tea drinking will help reduce obesity rates — it’s not beyond the infusion’s power.

Dietary fibers, whether from food sources or in concentrated supplement form, have been used for hundreds of years to promote fullness, improve gut health and digestive functions, and help maintain strong immunity and heart health. Despite the fact that fiber intake is inversely associated with hunger, body weight and body fat, studies show that the average fiber intake of adults in the United States is still less than half of recommended levels. (9)
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