Research regarding grapefruit’s effects on olfactory stimulation (how smelling the aroma affects the central nervous system) shows that inhaling the fruit’s smell can positively alter autonomic nerve signaling, lipolysis (fat metabolism) and appetite regulation. Here are several findings from a number of studies about how grapefruit essential oil impacts appetite and body weight: (7, 8)
Jonathan Valdez, registered dietitian and owner of Genki Nutrition, agrees. "The catechins in green tea promote fat loss by increasing energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and decreased lipid absorption by the intestine. Valdez believes that even though tea can be used as a fat burner, this shouldn’t promote excess caloric intake. "In the end, over-consumption will trump this process and lead to weight gain. Drinking these teas should be used as more of a complement to weight loss with current habits of decreasing calories and physical activity. Bottom line, tea shouldn’t be relied on as a source of burning calories versus cutting calories and physical activity."
You can eat twice as much pasta salad loaded with veggies like broccoli, carrots, and tomatoes for the same calories as a pasta salad sporting just mayonnaise. Same goes for stir-fries, omelets, and other veggie-friendly dishes. If you eat a 1:1 ratio of grains to veggies, the high-fiber veggies will help satisfy your hunger before you overeat the grains. Bonus: Fiber is highly beneficial for preventing constipation, which can make you look bloated.
Loving your body is fine but being fat is so unhealthy! Diabetes, heart disease, some cancers, Alzheimer — well, I’ll stop preaching. Recipes all look wonderful. One thing I’ve found is that so often frying onions is the first step. I have a griddle and instead of pouring oil into a frying pan I spray a bit of oil on my griddle, grill the sliced onions, peppers whatever. They give off enough moisture that you can just put them into the un-oiled frying pan and proceed with the recipe minus a bunch of calories..
DON'T simply switch out your meat and dairy for vegan meat and dairy substitutes (soy meats and cheeses). While it is okay to occasionally eat these foods if you go vegan and have NO weight to lose (always buy organic or non-GMO soy foods), it's not ideal if you DO have weight to lose. Many of these "faux foods" are high in fat and sodium, which go against your weight loss efforts. Much better to teach yourself how to create a whole foods vegan menu from the get go;
Prep foods in advance. To make sure you stick to your diet plan, organize your meals in advance. You can do this after dinner in the evening. Lay out the foods you'll eat for breakfast so they are ready to go when you wake up. Then pack your lunch and snacks for the next day. Finally, do any meal prep for the next night's healthy dinner so that it's easy to throw together when you come home from work.
It may be tempting to grab a tofu- or pea protein-based meat substitute when you're in a pinch, or even on the regular, but these products are often highly processed and filled with fattening, chemical-laden ingredients, such as sugars, hydrolyzed starch, or the additive disodium guanylate. Plus, many options are just as high if not higher in fat, sodium, and calories than the real thing, says Nandi.
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined the anti-obesity effects of tea flavones. The study analyzed 4,280 men over a 14-year period. The researchers focused on 6 specific catechins and 3 flavones during the study period. The study was also adjusted for factors including type 2 diabetes, smoking status, and lifestyle. After the adjustment, researchers found that increased flavone intake resulted in healthier BMIs. The improvements were seen mainly in the female participants.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
×