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The first ingredient listed on this supplement is Vitamin B6 and, considering this is labeled a sleep aid, that may seem confusing to you. But the benefits of B6 aren’t just to give you an energy boost. B6 helps brain functions and aids in serotonin production, which will improve mood and increase the production of natural melatonin. Melatonin, which is also included in this suppressant’s formula, controls your sleep cycle. The green tea extract will increase your metabolic rate, resulting in a boost to fat burning – all while you sleep!


2. Switch from saturated to unsaturated fats. Our ancestors also ate wild meat, which contains just 4 percent fat compared to the 25-30 percent in our usual chops and burgers. What's more, wild game contains twice as much unsaturated fat as domesticated meats, making its fat composition more like nuts than beef. Boost your diet's ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats by getting your protein from beans, fish, shellfish, skinless poultry breast, fat-free milk products and the occasional wild game, such as venison. Eat oils, nuts, seeds and fruits (avocados, olives) that are loaded with unsaturated fats.
After dinner, wash all the dishes, wipe down the counters, turn out the light, and, if necessary, tape closed the cabinets and refrigerator. Late-evening eating significantly increases the overall number of calories you eat, a University of Texas study found. Learning how to stop late-night snacking can save 300 or more calories a day, or 31 pounds a year.
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"Kibbeh" describes dishes made with bulgur, onions and spices. That mixture is combined with everything from tomatoes to goat. It's layered and baked, shaped into balls or footballs, stuffed, deep-fried or eaten raw. This vegetarian kibbeh recipe is made with pumpkin and stuffed with seasoned greens. Sorrel adds a lemony flavor, but you can use chard or kale and add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice to the filling. Use fine bulgur or the texture of the dough will be gritty.
Studies show that people who eat nuts tend to be leaner than those who don’t, and a recent Harvard study revealed that nuts are a top food for driving weight loss. In particular, unshelled pistachios are a great choice, as removing the shells slows you down and seeing evidence of what you’ve eaten may prevent you from reaching for more. In a recent study out of Eastern Illinois University, people who were given unshelled pistachios consumed 41 percent fewer calories than those offered nuts with the shells already removed. With all nuts, be mindful of your portion size, as they’re calorie-dense: a 1-ounce serving of pistachios (49 nuts) contains 157 calories.
There's some scientific evidence that compounds in saffron could have beneficial metabolic effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, and potentially impact weight, says Rekha Kumar, MD, endocrinologist at the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "That doesn’t mean putting [saffron] in a lollipop and telling people to eat it is a healthy approach to weight loss, body image, or nutrition," Dr. Kumar says.

Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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