"Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food," Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
Meal planning is a vital component to ensure proper nutrition and weight loss, and, thankfully, supermarkets now sell pre-packaged vegetables that are table-ready in minutes. Examples of fast-and-easy dishes include quinoa bowls with tempeh; a mixed stir-fry blend of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms; eggplant cutlets with marinara sauce, vegan cheese, and basil; and soba noodles with greens. If these meals are beyond your scope, meal delivery services such as HelloFresh and meal-planning services such as PlateJoy provide easy-to-follow recipes that are pre-measured and dietitian-approved.
If a vegetarian diet is not balanced and fails to fulfill the necessary nutritional requirements, it could lead to various deficiencies. Studies have shown that many vegetarians end up with protein deficiencies and lack long­-chain fatty acids and vitamins A, D, and B12 in their diet. Lack of nutrition can also lead to calcium, iron, and zinc deficiencies. But that does not make the vegetarian diet the culprit. It’s the wrong food choices. A wholesome vegetarian meal can never go wrong. Including fiber-rich and antioxidant-rich foods in your meal, getting your complete dose of nutrition, and thinking before eating will keep deficiencies at bay.

Researchers found that vegans lost more weight than TLC dieters and kept lost weight off better. The TLC diet restricts fat intake, advising dieters to skip butter and cheese as well as red meat, but permits dieters to eat lean animal proteins, including skinless chicken and fish. A vegan diet has eaters subsist on leafy greens, starchy vegetables, soy proteins, beans and legumes and some nuts and oils.
New Delhi: Most of us know that herbal teas are good for health. They are loaded with antioxidants and other properties that promote overall health and lower your risk of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, etc. Drinking tea helps boost your metabolism and detoxifies your system. Studies have found that consuming tea, particularly green tea, may improve weight loss and help fight belly fat.
While the majority of adults worldwide consume at least some caffeine daily, mostly in the form of coffee or tea, abnormally high amounts of caffeine are usually limited to “fat-burning” supplements. When weight loss pill manufacturers include caffeine in amounts they’re rarely used otherwise, it’s likely to cause both short-term issues like dependence and jitteriness or, even worse, dangerous interactions with existing medical conditions or medications.
The researchers hypothesize that participants who abstained from animal products dropped significantly more pounds since plant-based foods include loads of filling fiber and slow-to-digest complex carbs. Though more research is needed to confirm these results, the study authors write, "Vegetarian diets appeared to have significant benefits on weight reduction compared to non-vegetarian diets."
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 65 percent of American adults age 20 and up are overweight or obese, but the prevalence of obesity among vegetarians and vegans is below 10 percent. On average, the body weights of both male and female vegetarians are three percent to 20 percent lower than omnivores. Research has also found that switching to a healthy vegan diet leads to weight loss, even without changes to exercise or limits on portion size, calories, or carbohydrates. And, studies have found an increase in calorie burn after vegan meals, meaning plant-based foods may be used more efficiently as fuel for the body, as opposed to being stored as fat—pretty powerful support for a plant-based diet. But in my years of private practice I’ve also seen people gain weight by going vegetarian, when they don’t get the right balance. Here are some veggie dos and don’t’s: 

You've been hearing it since you were in grade school, but breaking the fast, the origin of the word breakfast, is a rule to live by. In addition to jump-starting your metabolism, a morning meal has a ripple effect on your intake. Breakfast skippers eat 40 percent more sweets, 55 percent more soda, 45 percent fewer vegetables and 30 percent less fruit than those who eat breakfast. In addition, breakfast skippers are 4.5 times more likely to be overweight.


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